Classical Music online - News, events, bios, music & videos on the web.

Classical music and opera by Classissima

Johannes Brahms

Sunday, July 23, 2017


My Classical Notes

July 15

Chamber Music by Brahms

My Classical NotesI have a new recording for you today that features the Brahms Piano Quintet and also the String Quartet No. 3 Brahms: Piano Quintet in F minor, Op. 34, with Peter Frankl (piano) String Quartet No. 3 in B flat major, Op. 67, performed by the Artis Quartet, Vienna. Peter Frankl made his name on the international circuit as a young pianist in the 1960’s, and, since that time, he has appeared many world renowned conductors. Following his London debut in 1962 and his New York debut with the Cleveland Orchestra, he has been performing with many orchestras in the USA and Europe including all the London orchestras and has given master classes all over the world, including the Royal Academy and Royal College in London, Liszt Academy in Budapest and the Van Cliburn Institute in Texas. He lives in London and is visiting professor at Yale University in the USA. Founded in Vienna in 1980, the Artis-Quartett launched an international career with regular performances in the world’s most important music centres including New York, London, Paris, Tokyo, Berlin, Vienna and Amsterdam. In Vienna they have performed an annual cycle of concerts at the Wiener Musikverein since 1988. Here is the opening movement of the Brahms Quartet number 3:

Norman Lebrecht - Slipped disc

July 9

Is playing and teaching at the same festival just a bow too far?

From our weekly diarist, violinist Anthea Kreston: We are in the car on the way to Venice for the weekend – we are in the middle of our two weeks in the northern part of Italy, playing trio concerts and teaching at a festival in a small town in the Dolomites. In the car are my husband and our two daughters (age 5 and 7), and squeezed in-between, our pianist, Amy Yang. Rehearsals are short and frequent – a movement of Brahms crammed between teaching students (a nice international crowd from age 10-young professionals). We are performing every night, either trio or mixed faculty concerts. The contrast of rehearsal style is stark – compared to the detailed, intense quartet rehearsals I have become accustomed to this past year. This translates into concerts which are quite carefree – the joints in the music are acknowledged, structure is secure, voicing is decided, and each member of the ensemble is in charge of guiding the flow and emotional content of their designated phrases – we all go with the flow. Every time I agree to come to a festival where I do double duty – teaching and performing – I have a heavy wave of regret on the second day. “Why on earth did I agree to do this? This is insane – both my teaching and performing are compromised, I am exhausted, the outings I planned with my family are put off and off – let me please remember to say “no” next time anyone asks me to do this!!” But then, around day 4, I start to get used to it. My daughters have made friends, have found all the nooks and crannies of the festival building, enjoy their daily gelato outings, staying up really late, going to the grocery store, playing in the river. I realize that this is the way memories are made. I often think of my early memories of camps – the ice cream, riding my first skateboard, my teacher’s big hair, the swimming pool. This week, my daughters were in their first quartet – with 2 of my old students from Oregon. We met every day – we played rhythm games with fly swatters, took turns being the orchestra for each other’s solo pieces, and learned two quartets. They all brought fancy dresses, named their group (The Rainbow Spy Dodgers), made a big stack of handmade programs for the concert, and performed in the town hall to an appreciative audience – their feet dangling from their chairs, too little to touch the floor. And now – off to Venice – I play the four seasons again with the same orchestra as a couple of weeks ago (Interpreti Veneziani), and 25 of the students will come to the concert. The entire Rainbow Spy Dodgers will be together in Venice for 2 days – and our daughters are looking forward to showing them the places they discovered last year. The building of life-time memories.






Johannes Brahms
(1833 – 1897)

Johannes Brahms (7 May 1833 - 3 April 1897) was a German composer and pianist, and one of the leading musicians of the Romantic period. Born in Hamburg, Brahms spent much of his professional life in Vienna, Austria, where he was a leader of the musical scene. In his lifetime, Brahms' popularity and influence were considerable; following a comment by the nineteenth-century conductor Hans von Bülow, he is sometimes grouped with Johann Sebastian Bach and Ludwig van Beethoven as one of the Three Bs. Brahms composed for piano, chamber ensembles, symphony orchestra, and for voice and chorus. A virtuoso pianist, he premiered many of his own works; he also worked with some of the leading performers of his time, including the pianist Clara Schumann and the violinist Joseph Joachim. Many of his works have become staples of the modern concert repertoire. Brahms, an uncompromising perfectionist, destroyed many of his works and left some of them unpublished. Brahms is often considered both a traditionalist and an innovator. His music is firmly rooted in the structures and compositional techniques of the Baroque and Classical masters. He was a master of counterpoint, the complex and highly disciplined method of composition for which Bach is famous, and also of development, a compositional ethos pioneered by J. Haydn, W.A. Mozart and Ludwig van Beethoven. Brahms aimed to honour the "purity" of these venerable "German" structures and advance them into a Romantic idiom, in the process creating bold new approaches to harmony and melody. While many contemporaries found his music too academic, his contribution and craftsmanship have been admired by subsequent figures as diverse as the progressive Arnold Schoenberg and the conservative Edward Elgar. The diligent, highly constructed nature of Brahms's works was a starting point and an inspiration for a generation of composers.



[+] More news (Johannes Brahms)
Jul 21
Kenneth Woods- A ...
Jul 21
The Well-Tempered...
Jul 19
Wordpress Sphere
Jul 19
Meeting in Music
Jul 15
Wordpress Sphere
Jul 15
My Classical Notes
Jul 14
The Well-Tempered...
Jul 11
Google News USA
Jul 11
Google News AUSTR...
Jul 11
Google News CANADA
Jul 11
Google News UK
Jul 11
Google News IRELAND
Jul 11
Google News UK
Jul 11
The Well-Tempered...
Jul 10
The Well-Tempered...
Jul 9
Norman Lebrecht -...
Jul 8
My Classical Notes
Jul 8
Google News AUSTR...
Jul 8
Google News CANADA
Jul 8
Google News IRELAND

Johannes Brahms




Brahms on the web...



Johannes Brahms »

Great composers of classical music

Lullaby Piano Vienna Clara Schumann Requiem Concerto Variations On A Theme By Haydn

Since January 2009, Classissima has simplified access to classical music and enlarged its audience.
With innovative sections, Classissima assists newbies and classical music lovers in their web experience.


Great conductors, Great performers, Great opera singers
 
Great composers of classical music
Bach
Beethoven
Brahms
Debussy
Dvorak
Handel
Mendelsohn
Mozart
Ravel
Schubert
Tchaikovsky
Verdi
Vivaldi
Wagner
[...]


Explore 10 centuries in classical music...